Kite & Laslett, Panoptic, 2012, Steel, mirror foil, wire


Kite & Laslett, Panoptic, 2012, Steel, mirror foil, wire


Malin Holmberg, I am a Free Woman, 2012, Performance


Malin Holmberg, I am a Free Woman, 2012, Performance


Courtyard of the former women’s prison at Kantstrasse 79, Berlin


Margo Trushina, Free Pussy Riot, 2012, Performance


Margo Trushina, Free Pussy Riot, 2012, Performance


Corridor of prison cells in the former women’s prison at Kantstrasse 79, Berlin


Franz Reimer, Mind and Matter Pt. 1, 2011, Multimedia installation


Franz Reimer, Mind and Matter Pt. 1, 2011, Multimedia installation


Franz Reimer, Mind and Matter Pt. 1, 2011, Multimedia installation


Internal balcony in the former women’s prison at Kantstrasse 79, Berlin


Malin Holmberg, This is Where I Keep my Pride, Oil and acrylic on canvas and floor


AES+F, Tondo, 2005-2007, Digital print on canvas






The Berlin Project

Curated by Colet Castano, Fanny Diehl, Stina Gustafsson, Nora Heidorn & Filippa Forsberg

Former women’s prison at Kantstrasse 79, Berlin

September 2012

With site-specific installations by:
Malin Holmberg
Kite & Laslett
Franz Reimer
Sebastian Schmieg
Margo Trushina
Julia Vogl

With works by:
AES+F
Marcus Harrling and Moa Geistrand
MARCK
Post-it Cities
Antonio Riello
Steve Rosenthal

The Berlin Project was a weeklong exhibition in a former women’s prison in Berlin. The exhibition presented eight site-specific works, which the artists developed for the architecturally and historically significant site, as well as existing pieces. The Berlin Project acted as an extended platform through a programme of talks, tours and events, as well as a publication.

The self-published catalogue Platform79 - The Publication communicates the curatorial and artistic research leading up to the opening of the former women's prison to the public. It contains contributions from the artists, as well as features, historical texts, interviews and essays from contributing writers and the curators.

The weeklong exhibition welcomed around 2000 local and international visitors. The Berlin Project was well received by German and international media and has been featured in the book OFF SPACES & SITES, Außergewöhnliche Ausstellungsorte abseits des etablierten Kunstmarkts.

The building on Kantstraße, in the heart of former West Berlin, was designed in 1896 by Adolf Bürckner and Eduard Fürstenau. A hundred cells of just six square metres are aligned along corridors on the four stories of the prison building. During the Third Reich, women engaged in political resistance were imprisoned here, some during their last days before execution. The prison has been derelict since 1985 and awareness of the building's former use and history remains low in the local area. There is no memorial plaque on the building and it is not visible from the street.

The Berlin Project was kindly supported by Grüntuch Ernst Architekten, Absolut Vodka, Bittes Idé & Dekoration AB, Design Akademie Berlin, Diehl Berlin, Planet Modulor, Sprintout.

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